Rome Apple Review

"Queen of the Baking Apple"

28
Despicable
Rome Apple

🏅 #1 RANKED BAKING APPLE

The Rome Apple (named after Rome Township, Ohio – not Italy) tastes like an unscented urinal cake lodged in a Gladiator helmet. Perplexingly tasteless and drier than Cicero’s wit, the inedible choking hazard it calls skin becomes a happy memory once you come face-to-face with the chalky ashes of Nero’s victims within. And yet, despite being a revolting munching apple, the Ohio Rome (again, not Italy) stays relevant by holding the appellation “Queen of the Baking Apple”. A true Adonis, this undeniable beauty retains its shape and form even when hollowed and baked, developing a richer flavor once cooked. So when in Rome (Ohio)…do as the Romans do – and bake your fruit.

BONUS POINTS: +2 Baking Apple

Taste
Crispness
Skin
Flesh
Juiciness
Density
Beauty
Branding / Consistency
Cost / Availability

- FLAVOR PROFILE -

SWEETNESS

0/5

Red Apple Icon
0/5

TARTNESS

0/5

Red Apple Icon
0/5

INTENSITY

0/5

Red Apple Icon
0/5
ROME APPLE BIO

PARENTAGE

Heirloom

ORIGIN

Rome Township, Ohio

YEAR

1817

AVAILABILITY

Late Fall – Early Winter

BEST USES

Baked Apples

OTHER NAMES

Gillet’s Seedling,

Red Rome, Rome Beauty, 

Baker’s Buddy

7 thoughts on “Rome Apple Review”

  1. Congrats on the F100 scale. I’ve enjoyed reading through the site and especially appreciate the lambasting you gave the Red Delicious which is the most offensive apple I’ve ever had the misfortune to eat.

    Might I suggest another apple to your list of apples reviewed? The humble Haralson apple is not going to rate high as a munching apple, but it is the true Queen of Baking Apples as it makes the best baked apple desserts… according to my family, anyway. (The apple is also referenced as the best baking apple in the book The Lager Queen of Minnesota, so my family is not alone in its commitment to the Haralson!)

  2. I agree whole heartedly that the Haralson is the best baking apple. It was one of the early developments from the University of Minnesota, and had fairly strong popularity, but are getting harder to find. I almost never see them in large grocery stores, but food co-ops in Minnesota that have local apples still have them in stock. Or, though I know it’s not considered”widely available to the public” by the website, going directly to a Minnesota apple orchard is a sure bet.

  3. Baked apples are divine! I use Granny Smiths, as I prefer the tart flavor. But now I’m considering using the top Sweetango…

  4. Upon my initial encounter with this apple at the supermarket, I was filled with anticipation and eagerness. The anticipation was palpable as I eagerly awaited the opportunity to sample it. Upon arriving at my vehicle, I indulged in my initial bite. The initial thrill was swiftly replaced by a repugnant aversion. One would assume that the red delicious apple is the epitome of unpleasantness, but this new apple variety surpasses it in terms of unpalatability.

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