Braeburn Apple Review

"The Civil Rights Apple"

73
Pretty Good
Braeburn Apple

🏅 #4 RANKED SOUR APPLE |🏅 #7 RANKED BAKING APPLE

Back in the 1950s, in a time when single-colored apples ruled the day (see Red Delicious vs. Golden Delicious), the upstart New Zealand Braeburn shocked the world with a blasphemous skin boasting two colors at once: red and green. Despite the protestations of backwards apple purists desperately clinging to the bygone days of single-color apples, the Braeburn’s complex and stupendous flavor was undeniable; this multi-toned interloper was here to stay. And stay it did, becoming one of the most popular apples worldwide for the next seven decades.

Why can’t I find Braeburn Apples anymore?

In today’s fast-paced apple world this sweet-tart, spicy maverick may at long last be obsolete. Lacking the consistency of modern apples, and suffering from difficulties like Braeburn Browning Disorder due to higher internal carbon dioxide concentrations, enterprising breeders began looking for Braeburn descendants that could replace its parent (and be trademarked for profit of course). And so, the ungrateful children of the Braeburn: Envy, Jazz, Sweetie, and Kanzi are sweeping this trailblazing old-timer into oblivion, leaving no room on the grocery store shelf for the apple to whom they owe so much.

BONUS POINTS: +2 Historical Significance, +1 Baking

Taste
Crispness
Skin
Flesh
Juiciness
Density
Beauty
Branding / Consistency
Cost / Availability

- FLAVOR PROFILE -

SWEETNESS

2.5/5

Red Apple Icon
2.5/5

TARTNESS

3.5/5

Red Apple Icon
3.5/5

INTENSITY

3.5/5

Red Apple Icon
3.5/5
BRAEBURN BIO

PARENTAGE

Lady Hamilton x Granny Smith

ORIGIN

New Zealand

YEAR

1952

AVAILABILITY

Late Fall – Winter

BEST USES

Baking, Munching, Sour Apple

19 thoughts on “Braeburn Apple Review”

  1. So sad I can’t find them any more. I used to buy them whenever I could. A serious grown-up apple. The sweet/tart flavour is like no other.

  2. I MISS THEMMMMMMMM… seriously underrated apple, used to live near a local orchard that had these HUGE ones while growing up and having moved out to where it’s not available in the local orchards i am feeling its loss heavily. the king of old apples. my beloved braeburns. i miss them every day

  3. Braeburn are still widely available in the UK. When good, they’re, well, good. But all-too-often these days, they aren’t crisp enough (maybe due to excessive chill-storage?), even verging on mushy.

  4. Mediocre? I love Braeburn – although that might be because the other choices (Jazz, Gala, Granny Smith) are trash.

  5. braeburns are my favorite wtffff. where I live they are only ripe in the local orchards for 3 weeks of the year, and I make it a point to go pick my own and make apple butter from them. i feel attacked :’U

      1. We’re just saying it at least deserves a 75 Pretty Good. The fact that you can cook with it as well counts for something.
        Love the site, BTW; I’m here from SemiRad’s Friday Inspirations newsletter.

  6. Ate a Braeburn last night, never seen one before so I was curious. Worst apple I’ve ever had – texture was like a mouthful of sand it was so mealy. The flavor was really good but the texture was so unbearable I tossed it. :/

  7. Don’t know about you all, but if I bite into an apple and it’s a Braeburn, I spit it out on the spot and exclaim “It’s a Braeburn.”

  8. Oof – never heard of these before I’d moved to Germany, and I’m not a fan, but it seems the US has (had?) better strains? Over here they’re mealy and soft: not good for eating, but just fine for baking and cooking! Maybe I’ll try a Braeburn next time I’m in the States, if I can manage to find one…

  9. Braeburns are my favorite!!!! I discovered them about a year ago. I’m sooooo lucky the store I shop at in Kansas City has them regularly. I will be SO SAD if they stop selling them.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *